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Prevuius group

Group No. 147


Letter

J. The wise and the foolish

Group No.

J2300 – J2349

Group name

Gullible fools

Description

J2300. J2300. Gullible fools.
 
J2301. J2301. Gullible husbands. (Cf. J2311.0.1., J2311.2, J2311.7, J2312, J2313, J2314, J2315, J2316, J2324, J2331.) *Types 1313, 1406; *Liebrecht Zur Volkskunde 124; Bédier Fabliaux 265ff., 475; *Crane Vitry 227 No. 231; *Wesselski Hodscha Nasreddin I 225 No. 66; *BP III 337; *Pauli (ed. Bolte) No. 866; B[ö]dker Exempler 280, 296 Nos. 24, 59; Christensen DF XLVII 59; Spanish Exempla: Keller; India: Thompson-Balys.
 
J2301.1. J2301.1. Husband takes back faithless wife on her oath to be faithful. Heptameron No. 61.
 
J2301.2. J2301.2. His wife has become a widow. Numskull buys cloth used only by widows and is therefore convinced. India: Thompson-Balys.
 
J2301.3. J2301.3. Gullible husband removes from wife’s garment dust gathered while she lies with another man. Irish myth: Cross.
 
J2302. J2302. Gullible wives.
 
J2303. J2303. Gullible mother.
 
J2310. J2310. Nature of gullibility.
 
J2311. J2311. Person made to believe that he is dead. *Penzer IX 156; Christensen DF XLVII 228 No. 94.
 
J2311.0.1. J2311.0.1. Wife makes her husband believe that he is dead. (Cf. J2301.) *Type 1406; Bédier Fabliaux 475; *Pauli (ed. Bolte) No. 866; *Clouston Noodles 166; Christensen DF L 59; Italian Novella: *Rotunda.
 
J2311.1. J2311.1. Numskull is told that he is to die when his horse breaks wind three times. When this happens he lies down for dead. *Wesselski Hodscha Nasreddin I 216f. No. 49; *Fb ”æsel“; Köhler-Bolte I 135, 486, 505.
 
J2311.1.1. J2311.1.1. Man believes he is to die when he breaks wind. Lies down for dead. India: Thompson-Balys.
 
J2311.1.2. J2311.1.2. Numskull is told that he will die when his mouth bleeds. India: Thompson-Balys.
 
J2311.1.3. J2311.1.3. Man believes, he will die when water falls on his head. India: Thompson-Balys.
 
J2311.1.3.1. J2311.1.3.1. Numskull believes he is dead when pumpkin falls on his head. India: Thompson-Balys.
 
J2311.1.4. J2311.1.4. Man believes he will die when he gets a scarlet thread on his coat. India: *Thompson-Balys.
 
J2311.1.5. J2311.1.5. Fool, told yellowing soles of his feet sure sign he is going to die, digs his grave and lies in it. India: Thompson-Balys.
 
J2311.2. J2311.2. The ”poisoned“ pot. The wife tells the husband that a certain pot of preserves is poison. He decides to kill himself and eats the preserves. He believes that he is poisoned and lies down for dead. *Type 1313; *BP III 337; *Wesselski Hodscha Nasreddin II 237 No. 522; *Wesselski Morlini 49; *Bolte Frey 214; *Clouston Noodles 122; Italian: Basile Pentamerone I No. 4.
 
J2311.3. J2311.3. Sham revenant. A man takes refuge from robbers in an open grave. Robbers see him and ask what he is doing. ”It is my grave. I went out to get a breath of air.“ Wesselski Hodscha Nasreddin I 206 No. 6.
 
J2311.4. J2311.4. The dead man speaks up. A numskull who has lain down thinking he is dead is carried off in a bier. The carriers lose their way. He speaks up, ”I always went that way when I was alive.“ Wesselski Hodscha Nasreddin I 216f. No. 49; Italian Novella: *Rotunda; India: Thompson-Balys. Cf. Pauli (ed. Bolte) No. 860.
 
J2311.5. J2311.5. The dead man in spite of himself. Neighbors who have heard of the numskull’s death insist on the funeral although he is alive and well. He is persuaded and is carried on a bier. They meet a busy man whom they try to persuade to join them. He pleads business. The ”dead“ man speaks: ”It‘s no use, friend, to try to dissuade them.“ *Wesselski Hodscha Nasreddin I 239 No. 121; Italian Novella: Rotunda.
 
J2311.5.1. J2311.5.1. Supposed dead man on bier threatens his bearers. India: Thompson-Balys.
 
J2311.6. J2311.6. Sham-dead man punished. A numskull lies in an old grave to see the Day of Judgment. He hears bells and thinks that the Last Day has come. He is beaten by mule-drivers when he tells them that he is a dead man. He returns home and tells his wife that he returns from the dead. ”How goes it in heaven?“ ”For one thing, avoid mule-drivers.“ *Wesselski Hodscha Nasreddin I 216 No. 46.
 
J2311.7. J2311.7. Cold hands and feet for the dead man. His wife has told him that one tells a dead person by his cold hands and feet. He freezes his feet and hands and lies down for dead. Wolves eat his ass. ”Lucky for you that his master is dead!“ *Wesselski Hodscha Nasreddin I 225 No. 66; India: *Thompson-Balys.
 
J2311.8. J2311.8. Parents made to believe that they are dead and are married to each other again. Indonesia: DeVries’s list No. 270, Coster-Wijsman 73 No. 11.
 
J2311.9. J2311.9. Foolish peasants carry couple to burial; when ”corpses“ speak they flee in terror. India: Thompson-Balys.
 
J2311.10. J2311.10. Drunken man insists that he be beheaded. Is struck with the flat of his sword. He thinks he is dead. Cent Nouvelles Nouvelles No. 6; Italian Novella: *Rotunda.
 
J2311.11. J2311.11. Idiot tells his mother he has been dead twelve years. India: Thompson-Balys.
 
J2311.12. J2311.12. Supposed dead man roused with whip. India: Thompson-Balys.
 
J2312. J2312. Naked person made to believe that he is clothed. *Types 1406, 1620; *Clouston Noodles 163; *Pauli (ed. Bolte) No. 866; H. C. Andersen ”Kejserens ny Klæder“; Christensen DF L 64; Italian Novella: Rotunda.
 
J2314. J2314. Layman made to believe that he is a monk. *Type 1406; *Bédier Fabliaux 265, 468; Pauli (ed. Bolte) No. 866; Spanish Exempla: Keller; Italian Novella: *Rotunda.
 
J2315. J2315. Wife persuades husband that she has returned immediately. She goes to a neighbor’s to cook a fish. She is gone a week. She gets a new fish and cooks it and returns home with the hot fish. She convinces her husband of her short absence. Type 1406; Bédier Fabliaux 265, 458.
 
J2315.1. J2315.1. Wife leaves home, offers self to lover. Returning persuades husband that she has not been away. Irish myth: Cross; Italian Novella: Rotunda.
 
J2315.2. J2315.2. Gullible husband made to believe he has cut off his wife‘s nose. She, in another house, has had her nose cut off by mistake. She makes him believe he has done it by making him angry enough to throw a razor at her. When he throws the razor she claims it has cut off her nose. Spanish Exempla: Keller.
 
J2316. J2316. Husband made to believe that his house has moved during his absence. The wife and her confederates transform the house into an inn with tables, signs, drinkers, etc. The husband cannot find his house. *Type 1406; *Wesselski Hodscha Nasreddin I 274 No. 298; Bédier Fabliaux 266; Italian Novella: *Rotunda.
 
J2316.1. J2316.1. Man cannot recognize his own house which has been turned into a mansion by emperor. India: Thompson-Balys.
 
J2317. J2317. Well man made to believe that he is sick. *Chauvin VI 138 No. 291; Clouston Noodles 161; Clouston Tales II 30ff.; Pauli (ed. Bolte) No. 869.
 
J2317.1. J2317.1. Man thinks that he has diabetes. Rascals have sewed his trouser leg till it is too tight. Pauli (ed. Bolte) No. 680.
 
J2318. J2318. Numskull convinced that he is a thief. An article is stolen. Declared that whoever does not eat all his cheese is the thief. A stone is put in the numskull’s cheese so that he cannot eat it all. He admits the theft. *Pauli (ed. Bolte) No. 679.
 
J2321. J2321. Man made to believe that he is pregnant (has borne child). Chauvin V 185 No. 107; Penzer V 69; von der Hagen Gesammtabenteuer II *ix, 49 No. 24; Boccaccio Decameron IX No. 3 (Lee 277); Christensen DF XLVII, DF L 78; Italian Novella: *Rotunda; U.S.: Baughman.
 
J2321.1. J2321.1. Parson made to believe that he will bear a calf. In having his urine examined by a doctor, a cow‘s is substituted by mistake. (Or he dreams that he has borne a calf.) When a calf comes into the house he thinks that he has borne it. (Cf. J1734.1, K1955.2.) *Type 1739; *BP I 317 n. 1; *Fb ”kalv“; *Wesselski Bebel I 232 No. 148.
 
J2321.2. J2321.2. Man thinks he has given birth to a child by letting wind. Italian: Basile Pentamerone II No. 3; Christensen DF XLVII 228 No. 93.
 
J2321.3. J2321.3. Husband makes wife and mother-in-law believe he will bear a sheep. His wife was pregnant when he married her. Cheremis: Sebeok-Nyerges.
 
J2322. J2322. Drunken man made to believe that he has been to heaven and hell. He is dressed up as a rich lord and given rich food and drink. When put back into his own clothes he thinks that he has been to heaven. *Type 1531; Köhler-Bolte I 68; Wesselski Archiv Orientální I (1929) 80 f.; Shakespeare Induction to Taming of the Shrew; Italian Novella: *Rotunda.
 
J2323. J2323. Numskull believes that he is married to a man. Two men’s hands joined in fun with words ”I marry you.“ Fool thinks that he must get a bishop to annul the marriage. Wesselski Bebel II 142 No. 130.
 
J2324. J2324. Wife persuades her husband to have a good tooth pulled. Type 1406; Bédier Fabliaux 266ff.; Herbert III 20; *Crane Vitry 238 No. 248; Boccaccio Decameron VII No. 9 (Lee 231); Italian Novella: *Rotunda.
 
J2325. J2325. Husband made to believe that yarn has changed to tow through his carelessness. Thus his lazy wife is relieved from spinning. Type 1405; BP III 44.
 
J2325.1. J2325.1. Fool believes gold in bag turns to ashes because of child‘s urinating on it. Actually bag contained only ashes. India: Thompson-Balys.
 
J2326. J2326. The student from paradise. A student tells a woman that he comes from Paris. She understands him to say from paradise and gives him money and goods to take to her husband. *Type 1540; **Aarne FFC XXII 3 – 109; *Clouston Noodles 204 – 217 passim; *Pauli (ed. Bolte) No. 463; *Wesselski Bebel I 189 No. 50; Christensen DF L 35; Indonesia: Coster-Wijsman 73 No. IV.
 
J2326.1. J2326.1. Foolish woman gives swindler money for her parents in heaven. India: *Thompson-Balys.
 
J2326.2. J2326.2. Dream explained as a dead father’s demand for horses. Dupe gives them to trickster. India: Thompson-Balys.
 
J2326.3. J2326.3. Emperor wants to travel to paradise. Blindfolded and put on an ass. India: Thompson-Balys.
 
J2326.4. J2326.4. Alleged messenger from relatives in distress given goods to deliver. India: Thompson-Balys.
 
J2327. J2327. Man who asks for good weather given a box full of hornets. He thinks that it is filled with the weather. Köhler-Bolte I 324.
 
J2328. J2328. The moving church tower. To see whether the church is moving someone lays down his coat in front of it. It is stolen. They think that the church has passed over it. Type 1326; Köhler-Bolte I 324; Christensen DF L 218 No. 79.
 
J2331. J2331. Numskull with unimportant office boasts of it.
 
J2331.1. J2331.1. Proud sheriff has only nine farmers in his jurisdiction. *Wesselski Bebel I 139 No. 46.
 
J2331.2. J2331.2. Fool appointed to fictitious office boasts of it. ”Administrador de la yesca.“ Spanish: Boggs FFC XC 138 No. 1689A*; Italian Novella: *Rotunda.
 
J2332. J2332. Fool locked in dark room made to believe that it is continuous night. Spanish: Boggs FFC XC 137 No. 1684; Italian Novella: Rotunda.
 
J2333. J2333. The sledges turned in the direction of the journey. At night turned around by a joker. Type 1275.
 
J2334. J2334. Master persuaded to buy big fish since small ones creep out of all parts of his body. Pauli (ed. Bolte) No. 699.
 
J2335. J2335. The stag with iron shoes. Hunters shoot a stag and hide it. Another who sees puts a dead ass in the bag instead. When the bag is opened, one cries, ”Oh Jesus, we have shot a stag with iron shoes!“ Köhler-Bolte I 325.
 
J2336. J2336. Jewess makes parents believe that she is to give birth to the Messiah. She bears a girl. *Wesselski Mönchslatein 65 No. 53; *Wesselski Bebel I 213 No. 104; Lithuanian: Balys Index No. *1864; Italian Novella: Rotunda.
 
J2337. J2337. Dupe persuaded that he is invisible. Boccaccio Decameron VIII No. 3 (Lee 254); Italian Novella: Rotunda.
 
J2338. J2338. Adulteress makes husband believe that the birth of her mulatto child has been due to suggestion. Italian Novella: Rotunda.
 
J2341. J2341. Near-sighted man persuaded by doctor that he can see. Nouvelles Récréations No. 28.
 
J2342. J2342. Husband refuses to believe in wife‘s infidelity.
 
J2342.1. J2342.1. Husband refuses to believe that his wife is unfaithful, even when she is caught in the act. Italian Novella: *Rotunda.
 
J2342.2. J2342.2. Husband away three years accepts children born in his absence as his own. Italian Novella: Rotunda.
 
J2342.2.1. J2342.2.1. Woman gives birth to child fourteen months after husband’s departure. The latter is made to believe it is legitimate. Italian Novella: *Rotunda.
 
J2342.2.2. J2342.2.2. Cuckolded ”as per instructions.“ Woman tells husband that she has become pregnant during his absence according to his own instructions. Italian Novella: Rotunda.
 
J2342.3. J2342.3. She knows best: woman denies accusation of adultery. Husband dismisses the truthful accusers saying that she knows her shortcomings better than anyone else, and she denies it. Italian Novella: *Rotunda.
 
J2342.4. J2342.4. Husband praises wife‘s fidelity. Rascal tests it and finds it lacking. India: *Thompson-Balys.
 
J2342.5. J2342.5. Only husband remains ignorant about his wife’s infidelity. India: Thompson-Balys.
 
J2345. J2345. Fool kissed in sleep. Dreams he is being kissed by fairy. Is really a pig. India: Thompson-Balys.
 
J2346. J2346. Fool‘s errand. An apprentice, or newcomer or ignorant person, etc., is sent for absurd or misleading or nonexistent object or on a ridiculous quest. Canada, England, U.S.: *Baughman.
 
J2347. J2347. Occupational tricks on new employees. U.S.: *Baughman.
 
J2348. J2348. Dupe is persuaded that money will grow if he buries it. England: *Baughman.
 
J2349. J2349. Nature of gullibility – miscellaneous.
 
J2349.1. J2349.1. Dupe is made to believe horse will fly. Italian Novella: *Rotunda.
 
J2349.2. J2349.2. Wife makes husband believe that her paramour is Death. Italian Novella: *Rotunda.
 
J2349.3. J2349.3. Credulous king reads about ocean of milk and its properties. India: Thompson-Balys.
 
J2349.4. J2349.4. The woman who asked for news from home. Gets many impossible answers, which she believes. E.g., ”The cock has become sexton.“ – ”Yes, that is why he sang so well in the morning.“ (First edition X941.) *Type 1931.

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