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Prevuius group

Group No. 146


Letter

J. The wise and the foolish

Group No.

J2260 – J2299

Group name

Absurd scientific theories

Description

J2260. J2260. Absurd scientific theories – general.
 
J2270. J2270. Absurd astronomical theories.
 
J2271. J2271. Absurd theories concerning the moon.
 
J2271.1. J2271.1. The local moon. Numskull greets old moon as if it were new. ”I haven’t seen it before, for I have just come to the city.“ (Each town thought to have a different moon.) *Wesselski Hodscha Nasreddin I 218 No. 52; India: *Thompson-Balys.
 
J2271.2. J2271.2. What becomes of the old moon?
 
J2271.2.1. J2271.2.1. Lightning made from the old moon. *Wesselski Hodscha Nasreddin I 236 No. 109.
 
J2271.2.2. J2271.2.2. Stars made from the old moon. *Wesselski Hodscha Nasreddin I 208 No. 10.
 
J2271.3. J2271.3. Numskulls try to throw the moon over a cliff. England: *Baughman.
 
J2271.4. J2271.4. Numskulls attempt to capture moon and bring it home in a sledge. They get to the top of the hill a few minutes too late to reach it. England, Scotland: *Baughman.
 
J2272. J2272. Absurd theories concerning the sun.
 
J2272.1. J2272.1. Chanticleer believes that his crowing makes the sun rise. Disappointed when it rises without his aid. *Vossische Zeitung 17. Sept. 1910; India: *Thompson-Balys; N. A. Indian (Hopi): Voth FM VIII 176 No. 55.
 
J2272.2. J2272.2. Is today‘s sun the same as yesterday’s? India: Thompson-Balys.
 
J2272.3. J2272.3. Fools believe sun sleeps at certain woman‘s house. India: Thompson-Balys.
 
J2273. J2273. Absurd theories concerning the sky.
 
J2273.1. J2273.1. Bird thinks that the sky will fall if he does not support it. Pauli (ed. Bolte) No. 606; *Chauvin II 112 n. 2; Liebrecht *Zur Volkskunde 102; Spanish Exempla: Keller.
 
J2274. J2274. Absurd theories about the earth.
 
J2274.1. J2274.1. Why everyone doesn‘t live in the same place. The earth would become unbalanced. *Wesselski Hodscha Nasreddin I 245 No. 140.
 
J2274.2. J2274.2. Same air at home as abroad. Because the stars are the same. Wesselski Hodscha Nasreddin I 206 Nos. 3, 242.
 
J2274.3. J2274.3. Same climate at home and abroad. Because his members look the same in the two places. Wesselski Hodscha Nasreddin I 206 Nos. 3, 242.
 
J2275. J2275. Absurd theories about the stars.
 
J2275.1. J2275.1. Falling star supposed to have been shot down by astronomer. Christensen DF XLVII No. 55.
 
J2276. J2276. Absurd theories concerning time.
 
J2276.1. J2276.1. Dinner time comes soon in mountains because of rare atmosphere. U.S.: Baughman.
 
J2277. J2277. Absurd theories about clouds.
 
J2277.1. J2277.1. Clouds supposed to come from smoke. India: *Thompson-Balys.
 
J2280. J2280. Other absurd scientific theories. Irish myth: *Cross.
 
J2281. J2281. How the fishes got there. Guests of host who waters his wine put little fishes into the wine jug. ”Now I confess that I put water into the wine; otherwise the fishes could not be there.“ *Wesselski Bebel II 109 No. 32.
 
J2282. J2282. A drunkard cannot drown. A drunken man falls overboard but the skipper refuses to pick him up. ”A man who is soaked in wine cannot drown. No part of his body will absorb water.“ Wesselski Bebel II 143 No. 134.
 
J2283. J2283. The four-footed bishop. A fool finding a nun in bed with a bishop and not seeing her face concludes that the bishop must have four feet and so announces it. Bolte Frey 247 No. 86; Nouvelles Récréations No. 2; Italian Novella: Rotunda.
 
J2284. J2284. What killed the wolf. Peasants find a dead wolf and debate what killed it. A learned man shows that it froze internally from eating cold flesh. Bolte Frey 236 No. 59.
 
J2285. J2285. Foolish interpretation of omens. Jewish: Neuman.
 
J2285.1. J2285.1. Fool believing in omens refuses to prepare for death. Bird has chirped five times, which he thinks guarantees him five more years to live. Pauli (ed. Bolte) No. 289.
 
J2287. J2287. Belief that island may be towed by ships to new location. Irish myth: Cross.

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